NCCA Spring Retreat 2019

NCCA Spring Retreat 2019

The Spring Retreat was held at Trinity Conference Center, Pine Knoll Shores, NC.  The weather varied from warm and beautiful to chilly and rainy but spirits were bright inside the Trinity Center.  The conference area was decorated to remind us of the beautiful coastal area where Trinity is located.  We were able to enjoy a beautiful sunset over the marsh during our first session and the beach was popular for yoga, walks and jogging.

The retreat began on Wednesday with a preconference Session I presented by Greg Robins, MS, PA-C.  Greg shared his experience as a Physician Assistant working with dementia patients.  Greg is a Physician Assistant with Novant Health Palliative Care who works as an inpatient consultant at Kernersville and Thomasville Medical Centers.  

Greg presented an article, Early Palliative Care for Patients with Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer, demonstrating longer median survival for those receiving early palliative care. 

Following the educational session, we enjoyed an Ice Cream Social with much happy conversation and networking.  Games were available and there was a failed attempt to make a bonfire.  Many in the group enjoyed a time on the beach before or after the educational session.

Thursday

Thursday began with Sunrise Yoga with Teresa Jackson at the beach pavilion followed by a great breakfast which included many healthy options. 

The educational session began with ice-breakers at each individual table.  Greg McClain, the NCCA President and Rebekah Ramsey, the NCCA Vice President were introduced.  They welcomed everyone to the meeting.  Our local hostess, Marie Hurst, welcomed us and told us the history of the area.  We discussed Ethics in Session II, led by Deborah Love, JD, MBA, MASenior Director of Bioethics, Spiritual Care and Humanities for Novant Health.  Deb also holds an adjunct faculty appointment in the Department of Social Medicine at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine.

Deb presented the article, Ten Myths about Decision-Making Capacity, demonstrating myths in patients’ autonomous choices.  She reminded us that we have the ethical responsibility to understand the patients’ decision-making capacity and how it is assessed.   She presented the Glover Process for Ethical Decision-Making and several case studies demonstrating the principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice.

Chaplain Rona Watson

We then dismissed for a nice lunch where the participants grouped for lively conversation.  Some squeezed in a quick trip to the beach.  

Following lunch the North Carolina Chaplains’ Association business meetingwas held:

The meeting was called to order by Greg McClain, NCCA President.  The minutes from the 2018 Fall Session were approved.  The Finance Report was presented by Delbert Minner, treasurer.  Kathy Turner was elected as the new Treasurer.  

Changes to the Fall and Spring Meetings were shared by Education Chair, Colleen Danson.  The NCCA will move to longer events in the fall and a shorter event in the spring to take effect in 2020.  The Spring 2020 education event will be a one-day Education Day.  

Todd Higginson of the Recruitment Committee asked that members “nudge their colleagues to become a part of this group.”

Martha Brown shared the purpose of the Advocacy Committee: to promote and create opportunities for jobs for professional chaplains.  She mentioned Pastoral Care Week and asked members to post pictures of the sacred spaces in their places of work on our Facebook page.  www.facebook/northcarolinachaplainsassociation.

Terry Vilagos and Sara Stratton presented the opportunity for Journal Club participation.  They encouraged attendees to consider joining the Journal Club Exchange Group and the Skype meetings to earn research credits.

Chaplains Wanda Burton-Crutchfield and Elizabeth Stroop celebrate Elizabeth’s retirement.

Rebekah Ramsey recognized Retiring Chaplains:

  • Jackie Allen
  • Tony Biles
  • Becky Holmes
  • Jane Mitchell
  • Twyla Nelson
  • Elizabeth Stroop

In Other Business, Cynthia Vaughn, Past President, offered “you may be called to serve, please be open to say ‘yes’.  Be prayerful.”

The meeting was adjourned.

During Session III, Intersecting worlds of clinical ethics, spiritual care and palliative care, Greg Robins, MS, PA-C, Physician Assistant with Novant Health Palliative Care and Joanne L. S. Henley, M.Div., BCC, Novant Health, Director of Spiritual Care, and Deborah Love, JD, MBA, MA, Senior Director of Bioethics, Spiritual Care and Humanities for Novant Health reviewed the evolving role of clinical ethics in healthcare and recalled some notable cases.  They stressed the intersection of Ethics, Spiritual Care and Palliative Care.  They suggested that we “Listen Freshly” to capture the perspectives of all parties, demonstrate respect for all views, and exercise empathy.  The session contained case studies and a role play.  

The first session of “The Exchange” (educational offerings presented in breakout style) included the following offerings:

Creating an Ethics Committee– Deborah Love, JD, MBA, MA, the Senior Director of Bioethics, Spiritual Care and Humanities for Novant Health, taught the group about how to establish or revitalize the ethics committee within their organizations.

BCC Preparation– Rev. Chaplain Melanie Childers, BCC, LPCS, Director of Pastoral Care, Watauga Medical Center, presented resources and further information for those seeking board certification.

“Chaplainsourcing” – Elevating Staff Care in Your Setting– Chaplain Todd Higginson, Clinical Chaplain at UNC Johnson Health-Clayton, NC discussed making a priority of staff care within each facility.  The group explored creative ways to help leadership recognize the importance of building resilience in those who are caring for our patients.

Chaplains Bob Riley, Todd Higginson, and Greg McClain

The attendees enjoyed a free evening with a meal on their own.  Some traveled to Morehead City or Beaufort.  Reports were that the seafood and steaks were delicious, but the companionship was even better.  New friendships were kindled and old ones were renewed.  

Friday

On Friday, after enjoying Sunrise Yoga and a great breakfast, the second session of “The Exchange” occurred with the following offerings:

NCCA Journal Club– Terri Vilagos, M.Div.., BCC, Manager, Dept. of Spiritual Care & Education, Carolinas Rehabilitation – Charlotte and Sara Stratton, M.Div., BCC, Manager, Spiritual Care & Education, Atrium-Pineville, shared a research article and demonstrated the technique used to review and discuss during the Journal Club meeting every other month.  Terri and Sara stressed the benefits of using this activity to meet requirements for certification and for personal and professional growth.

Mindfulness, Relaxation & Centering– Teresa Jackson, our Yoga instructor, presented a session on techniques to use for mindfulness, relaxation and centering in our daily practice.

Communication with Hospital Leadership– David Long, Interim Spiritual Care Manager, New Hanover Regional Medical Center, Wilmington, presented tips and techniques for communicating with leadership.  He used his own powerful experience in advocating for the presence of spiritual arts at New Hanover.   

Chaplain Joanne Henley, M.Div., BCC

Session IV – Hoping for a Miracle, was led by Greg Robins, MS, PA-C, Physician Assistant with Novant Health Palliative Care and Joanne L. S. Henley, M.Div., BCC, Novant Health, Director of Spiritual Care.  Greg and Joanne presented four specific recommendations for providing a balanced, non-argumentative response to families that expect a miracle to intervene:

  • Emphasize non-abandonment
  • Cite professional obligations
  • Reframe the meaning of a miracle
  • Suggest that if a miracle occurs, physician actions will not prevent it
NCCA Holy Communion


The retreat closed with a worship led by Brooks Johnson, M.Div., Clinical Chaplain, High Point Medical Center.  This service included a time of reflection and dedication with Holy Communion.  Through a sacred reading we focused on our retreat time.  The service concluded with a recognition and remembrance of those who have passed recently.

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2018 Fall Education Summary

The meeting convened at Camp Caraway, Sophia, North Carolina on November 8, 2018.  The meeting was rescheduled from October due to hurricane damage and threats.  For attendees who arrived early, there was an excellent dinner, fire pit, games, and refreshments.  It was an evening of fellowship and relaxation.  Pictured at left, NCCA member, Rona Watson shows her mad Operation skills while David Long observes.

Vice President-Elect, Rebekah Ramsey, opened the meeting with a ceremony representing the release of those tensions participants brought, recognizing that many were affected by the recent hurricane.  Rocks were picked up to represent our tensions.  They were placed in a jug of water to represent burying tensions that could keep us from being fully present in the meeting.

Our speaker, Chaplain Stephen B. Roberts, BCC, is a Past President of the Neshama Association of Jewish Chaplains (NAJC) and served on the board for almost a decade.  Responding to the 9/11 terror attacks, he was the first Spiritual Care Officer overseeing the provision of Spiritual Care through national ARC’s SAIR team in New York City and then helped oversee the program as the Senior Volunteer from December 2001-May 2002.  Rabbi Roberts is a Founder and Chairman Emeritus of Disaster Chaplaincy Services.

Chaplain Roberts’ publications include: “Compassion Fatigue Among Chaplains, Clergy, and Other Respondents After September 11th” [Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease; November 2003] and Jewish Pastoral Care in Wake of a Disaster [Book Chapter—Jewish Pastoral Care—A Practical Handbook].

Over the last decade, Rabbi Roberts has worked very closely with the leadership of the Association of Professional Chaplains, National Association of Catholic Chaplains, the Association of Clinical Pastoral Education, American Association of Pastoral Counselors, Canadian Association for Spiritual Care, and other groups on a variety of critical chaplaincy leadership projects including helping create The Spiritual Care Collaborative; co-overseeing and co-guiding the process leading to the Common Standards for Professional Chaplaincy, Common Code of Ethics for Chaplains, Pastoral Counselors, Pastoral Educators and Students; participating in the approval of The White Paper. Rabbi Stephen B. Roberts presently serves as leader of the Temple of the High Country, Boone, NC.  He also functions as an Adjunct Chaplain with Watauga Valley Medical Center.

Session I:  Interactive Learning on Trauma and Professional Caregiving

Chaplain Roberts shared the key principles of Disaster Spiritual Care.  He based his training on his experiences and the experiences of others he has known who have experienced traumatic events.  He shared that most people do find a new balance without outside help.  The role of the spiritual care provider in a disaster is not to shelter victims, but to help them draw upon their own spiritual, religious, and emotional resources in the midst of their pain.  Their goal is to provide sensitive spiritual and emotional care to affected individuals and families by respecting a person’s culture, religious tradition, and faith commitments.

Session II:  Chaplain Roberts’ Reflections on Undergoing Personal Trauma

 

Chaplain Robert’s shared his personal experience with 9/11 and Hurricane Sandy.  He spoke of the “Heroic,” “Honeymoon” (community cohesion), “Disillusionment” (coming to terms), and “Reconstruction” (a new beginning) phases of personal trauma.

 

 

Business Session

Between Session II and III, the NCCA conducted a membership meeting.  Rebekah Ramsey was nominated to serve as Vice President.  No second needed since the recommendation came from the Nominating Committee.  She was unanimously approved to serve.

It was reported that the NCCA now has co-chairs with the intention of working together for a year and then one chair rolling off to maintain continuity.  A bio of the Co-Chairs and Officers of the NCCA can be found on the website.

Sara Stratton and TeresaMarie Vilagos presented information on the Journal Club available to NCCA members.  It meets every other month on the 2ndMonday of the month.  To join, please email admincoordinator@ncchaplains.com.  Your email will be forwarded to Sara and Terri so that you will be added to a meeting planner.

The club is looking for articles to present and people to present those articles. There is a template form for discussion. The goal of the group is to better understand research and gain comfort in research.  The group also meets the research CEU requirement for the APC.  In January, several research articles will be sent out for people to choose one they would like to present for discussion.

Session III:  The Use of Self in Professional Trauma Care—Integration Seminar

Chaplain Roberts shared the following insights.

  • In our lives there is commonly a difference between “bad/traumatic” periods and times and “challenging” periods and times. The group considered “bad” traumatic periods vs. “challenging” times and shared examples of these times with another person.
  • We may “relearn” different spiritual/ emotional lessons during our “bad” times and our “challenging” times. The group shared lessons learned from both situations.
  • We often use different spiritual tools during “bad” and “challenging” periods in our lives—of which we are often unaware.   Reading uplifting books including Scripture, cursing or feeling you have been cursed, spending time with friends and family, spiritual numbness, prayer and journaling. The group was challenged to identify the tools we used during our “bad” and “challenging” trauma.
  • We often use different prayers and prayer formats during “traumatic/ bad” periods in our lives of which we are often unaware unless pointed out to us.
  • After each period, upon reflection, we often learned something significant and new.Our job as spiritual leaders are to help those with whom we are working to move to this point of reflection.

 

Chaplain Roberts gave us this excerpt from Disaster Spiritual Care, 2ndEd.:  Practical Clergy Responses to Community, Regional and National Tragedy, edited by Rabbi Stephen B. Roberts and Rev. Willard W.C. Ashley, Sr., published by SkyLight Paths Publishing.

Disaster Spiritual Care Wisdom Sayings:

  • No one who “witnesses” a disaster is untouched by it.
  • Self-Care—Practice self-care and seek the support of others.
  • Basics—Meet the basic needs (food, water, shelter, and medical).
  • Diversity—Recognize the unknown god in diversity, spiritual care should be uniquely tailored to community or individual.
  • Connections—Healing happens within human relationships.
  • I and Thou—Ministry of presence, listening, struggle with victims as they ask questions.
  • Practical Tools—Spiritual assessment tool, “How are you doing?” Ritual is an effective means of healing.

Chaplain Roberts also shared an article, Disaster Spiritual Care, developed by the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster Points of Consensus which was written to inform, encourage, and affirm those who respond to disasters.

Evaluations of the conference were sent to attendees for whom email addresses were available, using survey monkey.  If you wish to receive the evaluation survey and did not, please contact Wanda, admincoordinator@ncchaplains.com.

The NCCA looks forward to our Spring Conference, April 2-4, 2019 at the Trinity Center in Pine Knolls Shores, NC.  We will focus on Ethics in the Healthcare System and how it impacts our work as professional chaplains.  Deb Love, Sr. Director of Bioethics, Spiritual Care, and Healing Arts with Novant Health, will lead our discussion.  Greg Robins, PA, with Palliative Care, will also aid in our understanding of the ethical implications around the end of life.  Look for an announcement of open registration by email.

Chaplains from New Hanover Regional Medical Center were all smiles at Fall Education Day.

 

Announcements Posted at the Fall Meeting

  • Chaplain Rebekah Ramsey announced approval from Novant Health Leadership to move forward to seek Pre-Accreditation status with ACPE to start a CPE Residency Program in the Fall of 2019 at Novant Health Presbyterian Medical Center in Charlotte, NC.Contact: Ramsey@novanthealth.org
  • Suzanne Franklin-Kent from Cone Health-Alamance Regional Medical Center announced that they have four open residency positions beginning in mid-January 2019. They are currently interviewing for these positions.  Contact:  Suzanne.franklin@conehealth.com
  • New Hanover Regional Medical Center announced that they are alive and well after the storms.David Long reports that they have a 3-year vision to continue CPE with first and second year residents. Contact:  long@nhrmc.org
  • There is an immediate opening for a Hospice Chaplain at Community Home Care and Hospice in Clayton, NC. It is a 24-hour a week job.  Details can be found on Indeed.com.  Contact: philliphare1@gmail.com

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Register For Fall Conference (new date), November 7-8, 2018

 

Due to Hurricane Michael’s visit to NC, registration for our new Fall Education date is open for Fall Conference 2018 at Caraway Conference Center in Sophia, NC!

Click here to proceed to the conference registration page.

Click here for a downloadable flyer of the event to print, post or share.

 

The conference facilitator is Chaplain Stephen B Roberts, BCC, Past President of the Neshama Association of Jewish Chaplains with service on the Board for almost a decade.  Responding to the 9/11 terror attacks, he was the first Spiritual Care Officer overseeing the provision of Spiritual Care through national American Red Cross’s Spiritual Care Aviation Incident Response Team in New York City and then helped oversee the program as the Senior Volunteer from December 2001-May 2002.  Rabbi Roberts is a Founder and Chairman Emeritus of Disaster Chaplaincy Services.

Over the last decade, Rabbi Roberts has worked very closely with the leadership of the Association of Professional Chaplains, National Association of Catholic Chaplains, the Association of Clinical Pastoral Education, American Association of Pastoral Counselors, Canadian Association for Spiritual Care, and other groups on a variety of critical chaplaincy leadership projects.  Rabbi Roberts was part of  helping to create The Spiritual Care Collaborative; co-overseeing and co-guiding the process leading to the Common Standards for Professional Chaplaincy, Common Code of Ethics for Chaplains, Pastoral Counselors, Pastoral Educators and Students; and participating in the approval of The White Paper.

Rabbi Roberts presently serves as leader of the Temple of the High Country, Boone, NC.  He also functions as an Adjunct Chaplain with Watauga Valley Medical Center.

 

Conference Schedule

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

7:00 pm – Pre-Conference Fellowship Event

Join your NCCA friends for board/card games and refreshments

 

Thursday, November 8, 2018

8:00 am – Registration Opens

8:45 am – Greetings, Welcome, Spiritual Reflection

9:00 am – Session I: Interactive Learning on Trauma and Professional Caregiving

10:45 am – Session II: Chaplain Roberts’ Reflections on Undergoing Personal Trauma

12:00 pm – Lunch

12:45 pm – NCCA Business Meeting

1:00 pm – Session III:The Use of Self in Professional Trauma Care Integration Seminar

2:30 pm – Evaluation and Wrap Up

 

A total of 4.25 contact hours will be offered.  Registrations accepted through September 28.  Late or cancelled registrations will incur a fee.  Please note that NCCA conferences are held at retreat centers, so please be prepared to bring along necessary toiletries or personal items.

 

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NCCA Supports Spiritual Care Week 2018

Spiritual Care Week 2018October 21-27, 2018

The theme for Spiritual Care Week in 2018 is “Hospitality – Cultivating Time.”

Spiritual care has a wonderful history of cultures and religions that build communities’ sense of support and meaning. This year’s theme continues the emphasis on hospitality with a focus on cultivating time. The welcoming and belonging associated with hospitality require time that is treated as precious in developing relationships.

This nurturing of connections requires an attitude of listening and appreciation. For those involved in the task-oriented dimensions of health and support, there is a temptation to achieve the quantitative dimensions of the profession and miss the depth of relationships that requires time.

Time allows the cared-for to express the real problem, the deeper implications and the meaning or despair that is felt at a soulful level.

Cultivating and nurturing time is a challenge in an age of instantaneous communication and multiple sources of connection. Human presence flows back and forth – it takes time for mutuality and trust to develop.  Cultivating time conveys to the recipient a treasuring of them as a person no matter what they are going through. We hope that this year you might appreciate even more the time taken in spiritual care which conveys preciousness and healing at every stage of life.

***

Spiritual Care Week/Pastoral Care Week is hosted by The COMISS Network: The Network on Ministry in Specialized Settings.  The first Pastoral Care Week was held in October 1985. Since then it has grown beyond national to international proportions. The celebration of Pastoral Care Week provides an opportunity for chaplains and pastoral care counselors, educators and providers to share their story and to celebrate various ministries. More specifically, the established objectives of the Pastoral Care Week Committee outline the scope of Pastoral Care Week observance:

  • To celebrate the education for and practice of spiritual care through professional chaplaincy and pastoral counseling.
  • To interpret and promote pastoral care.
  • To honor and celebrate all practitioners of pastoral care.
  • To express appreciation to institutions and their staff who support pastoral care ministries.
  • To publicize the work of pastoral care organizations affiliated with COMISS.
  • To promote continuing education for clergy, laity, and institutional employees regarding the value of pastoral care.

Each year a new theme brings to the light a certain aspect of pastoral care as a focus. A new theme invites us to new and creative ways to tell the story of pastoral care.

 

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Profile of Janice Wakefield, NCCA’s Newest Emeritus Member

At the annual meeting of the North Carolina Chaplains’ Association in May of 2018, Janice Wakefield was approved by the membership as an Emeritus Member.  This award includes the honor of free membership and meeting attendance.

Janice has been a member of NCCA for approximately 35 years.  She served the group as “Archivist” from 1984 to 1986.  During this time she wrote a history of the organization.  She served as Treasurer 1986 to 1988.  From there she move to the presidency of NCCA in 1988 to 1990.

Janice and Janet Forrest presented a program for the spring meeting a number of years ago.  Janice believes it was called Nuts and Bolts of Building a Palliative Care Program.

Janice did her first unit of CPE during seminary at what was known then as Louisville General Hospital.  Her residence was done at what is now Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

Her first job after her residency was at Wesley Long Hospital.  She served there for 12 years.  She served as a Clinical Chaplain at High Point Regional Medical Center for the remainder of her career and retired earlier this year.

Congratulations to Janice on her successful career as chaplain and thanks for her service to NCCA.

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